Posts Under Tooth Discoloration

Image result for baby tooth trauma
Trauma to Baby Teeth
Due to the active nature of children, trauma to the primary teeth (baby teeth) is very common. Most accidents to your child's baby teeth look bad, but may not require immediate attention. Swelling is to be expected and may look worse 12-24 hours after the injury. 

  • Tooth is knocked out  
    Clinical signs: The whole baby tooth is gone from its socket.
    Treatment: Control bleeding with firm pressure from a cloth. Locate the tooth and save for visual inspection by your child’s dentist.  Place the tooth in milk and contact us as soon as possible. Provide over-the-counter pain medicine and soft diet as needed. Contact us for evaluation.

  • Tooth is gray or brown in color
    Clinical signs: Tooth appears darker in color. Up to 70% of injured baby teeth can darken. A dark baby tooth does not always require treatment. These teeth are at a higher risk for dental abscess (infection).
    Treatment: Over-the-counter pain medicine if pain is associated with the discoloration.  Clinical examination and x-ray by us to evaluate for a dental abscess.

  • Tooth hit but not loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will sometimes exhibit some bleeding along the gum line but no real mobility of the tooth. These teeth will often be sore for 1-3 days but have a very good prognosis. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma. 
    Treatment: Soft diet and over the counter pain medicine (Tylenol) are indicated for initial treatment. Contact us for an evaluation.

  • Tooth hit and loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will usually exhibit bleeding and bruising of the gum tissue but appear to be in proper position. They may “wiggle” back and forth or side to side. These teeth will often be sore for several days and have a guarded prognosis. Usually they will tighten back to normal in 1-2 weeks. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma and is fairly common with this type of trauma. 
    Treatment: Minimize movement as soon as possible. Check to see if your child can close his teeth together normally. Firm pressure from a washcloth to control bleeding of the gum tissue, soft diet, and over the counter pain medications are indicated as needed. Contact us for an evaluation.

Dental Fluorosis 

  
One of the many types of common tooth discoloration is Dental Fluorosis.  Dental Fluorosis is a developmental distrurbance of dental enamel caused by excessive exposure to high concentrations of fluoride during tooth development.  These changes are most prone to occur in children between 20 and 30 months of age.  The critical period of exposure is between 1 and 4 years old.  Dental Fluorosis occurs when a child ingest too much fluoride.  Be certain that your child can fully spit out their toothpaste before introducing fluoride toothpaste .  When a child swallows fluoride toothpaste at a young age it can affect their permanent teeth that are forming.  The affects of fluorosis are strictly cosmetic.   The teeth are actually stronger because of the extra fluoride, however fluorosis can cause severe stain throughout the teeth.  

How to treat Dental Fluorosis?

Dental fluorosis can be cosmetically treated by a dentist.  Tooth bleaching, microabrasion, or a conservative composite restoration are commonly used treatments.  Typically bleaching and micro-abrasion are used for superficial staining, where constructive restorations are used for more unaesthetic situations.  Be aware that this treatment can cause severe tooth sensitivity, so it is recommended that you wait until teenage years to do treatment. 

Image result for baby tooth trauma
Trauma to Baby Teeth
Due to the active nature of children, trauma to the primary teeth (baby teeth) is very common. Most accidents to your child's baby teeth look bad, but may not require immediate attention. Swelling is to be expected and may look worse 12-24 hours after the injury. 

  • Tooth is knocked out  
    Clinical signs: The whole baby tooth is gone from its socket.
    Treatment: Control bleeding with firm pressure from a cloth. Locate the tooth and save for visual inspection by your child’s dentist.  Place the tooth in milk and contact us as soon as possible. Provide over-the-counter pain medicine and soft diet as needed. Contact us for evaluation.

  • Tooth is gray or brown in color
    Clinical signs: Tooth appears darker in color. Up to 70% of injured baby teeth can darken. A dark baby tooth does not always require treatment. These teeth are at a higher risk for dental abscess (infection).
    Treatment: Over-the-counter pain medicine if pain is associated with the discoloration.  Clinical examination and x-ray by us to evaluate for a dental abscess.

  • Tooth hit but not loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will sometimes exhibit some bleeding along the gum line but no real mobility of the tooth. These teeth will often be sore for 1-3 days but have a very good prognosis. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma. 
    Treatment: Soft diet and over the counter pain medicine (Tylenol) are indicated for initial treatment. Contact us for an evaluation.

  • Tooth hit and loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will usually exhibit bleeding and bruising of the gum tissue but appear to be in proper position. They may “wiggle” back and forth or side to side. These teeth will often be sore for several days and have a guarded prognosis. Usually they will tighten back to normal in 1-2 weeks. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma and is fairly common with this type of trauma. 
    Treatment: Minimize movement as soon as possible. Check to see if your child can close his teeth together normally. Firm pressure from a washcloth to control bleeding of the gum tissue, soft diet, and over the counter pain medications are indicated as needed. Contact us for an evaluation.

Dental Fluorosis 

  
One of the many types of common tooth discoloration is Dental Fluorosis.  Dental Fluorosis is a developmental disturbance of dental enamel caused by excessive exposure to high concentrations of fluoride during tooth development.  These changes are most prone to occur in children between 20 and 30 months of age.  The critical period of exposure is between 1 and 4 years old.  Dental Fluorosis occurs when a child ingest too much fluoride.  Be certain that your child can fully spit out their toothpaste before introducing fluoride toothpaste .  When a child swallows fluoride toothpaste at a young age it can affect their permanent teeth that are forming.  The affects of fluorosis are strictly cosmetic.   The teeth are actually stronger because of the extra fluoride, however fluorosis can cause severe stain throughout the teeth.  

How to treat Dental Fluorosis?

Dental fluorosis can be cosmetically treated by a dentist.  Tooth bleaching, microabrasion, or a conservative composite restoration are commonly used treatments.  Typically bleaching and microabrasion are used for superficial staining, where constructive restorations are used for more unaesthetic situations.  Be aware that this treatment can cause severe tooth sensitivity, so it is recommended that you wait until teenage years to do treatment. 

Image result for baby tooth trauma
Trauma to Baby Teeth
Due to the active nature of children, trauma to the primary teeth (baby teeth) is very common. Most accidents to your child's baby teeth look bad, but may not require immediate attention. Swelling is to be expected and may look worse 12-24 hours after the injury. 

  • Tooth is knocked out  
    Clinical signs: The whole baby tooth is gone from its socket.
    Treatment: Control bleeding with firm pressure from a cloth. Locate the tooth and save for visual inspection by your child’s dentist.  Place the tooth in milk and contact us as soon as possible. Provide over-the-counter pain medicine and soft diet as needed. Contact us for evaluation.

  • Tooth is gray or brown in color
    Clinical signs: Tooth appears darker in color. Up to 70% of injured baby teeth can darken. A dark baby tooth does not always require treatment. These teeth are at a higher risk for dental abscess (infection).
    Treatment: Over-the-counter pain medicine if pain is associated with the discoloration.  Clinical examination and x-ray by us to evaluate for a dental abscess.

  • Tooth hit but not loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will sometimes exhibit some bleeding along the gum line but no real mobility of the tooth. These teeth will often be sore for 1-3 days but have a very good prognosis. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma. 
    Treatment: Soft diet and over the counter pain medicine (Tylenol) are indicated for initial treatment. Contact us for an evaluation.

  • Tooth hit and loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will usually exhibit bleeding and bruising of the gum tissue but appear to be in proper position. They may “wiggle” back and forth or side to side. These teeth will often be sore for several days and have a guarded prognosis. Usually they will tighten back to normal in 1-2 weeks. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma and is fairly common with this type of trauma. 
    Treatment: Minimize movement as soon as possible. Check to see if your child can close his teeth together normally. Firm pressure from a washcloth to control bleeding of the gum tissue, soft diet, and over the counter pain medications are indicated as needed. Contact us for an evaluation.

Dental Fluorosis 

  
One of the many types of common tooth discoloration is Dental Fluorosis.  Dental Fluorosis is a developmental distrurbance of dental enamel caused by excessive exposure to high concentrations of fluoride during tooth development.  These changes are most prone to occur in children between 20 and 30 months of age.  The critical period of exposure is between 1 and 4 years old.  Dental Fluorosis occurs when a child ingest too much fluoride.  Be certain that your child can fully spit out their toothpaste before introducing fluoride toothpaste .  When a child swallows fluoride toothpaste at a young age it can affect their permanent teeth that are forming.  The affects of fluorosis are strictly cosmetic.   The teeth are actually stronger because of the extra fluoride, however fluorosis can cause severe stain throughout the teeth.  

How to treat Dental Fluorosis?

Dental fluorosis can be cosmetically treated by a dentist.  Tooth bleaching, microabrasion, or a conservative composite restoration are commonly used treatements.  Typically bleaching and microabrasion are used for superficial staining, where constructive restorations are used for more unaesthetic situations.  Be aware that this treatment can cause severe tooth sensitivitiy, so it is recommended that you wait untill teenage years to do treatment. 

tetracycline staining due to stain removing main types of bacterial

The most common stain we see on baby teeth is black line stain.  Black line stain is harmless and strickly cosmetic.  Black line stain can be removed at your child's dental cleanings.  Patients that have black line stain tend to have less cavities, because their saliva is less acidic.  Using an electric toothbrush will help remove the stain at home.  


Trauma to Baby Teeth
Due to the active nature of children, trauma to the primary teeth (baby teeth) is very common. Most accidents to your child's baby teeth look bad, but may not require immediate attention. Swelling is to be expected and may look worse 12-24 hours after the injury. 

  • Tooth is knocked out  
    Clinical signs: The whole baby tooth is gone from its socket.
    Treatment: Control bleeding with firm pressure from a cloth. Locate the tooth and save for visual inspection by your child’s dentist.  Place the tooth in milk and contact us as soon as possible. Provide over-the-counter pain medicine and soft diet as needed. Contact us for evaluation.

  • Tooth is gray or brown in color
    Clinical signs: Tooth appears darker in color. Up to 70% of injured baby teeth can darken. A dark baby tooth does not always require treatment. These teeth are at a higher risk for dental abscess (infection).
    Treatment: Over-the-counter pain medicine if pain is associated with the discoloration.  Clinical examination and x-ray by us to evaluate for a dental abscess.

  • Tooth hit but not loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will sometimes exhibit some bleeding along the gum line but no real mobility of the tooth. These teeth will often be sore for 1-3 days but have a very good prognosis. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma. 
    Treatment: Soft diet and over the counter pain medicine (Tylenol) are indicated for initial treatment. Contact us for an evaluation.

  • Tooth hit and loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will usually exhibit bleeding and bruising of the gum tissue but appear to be in proper position. They may “wiggle” back and forth or side to side. These teeth will often be sore for several days and have a guarded prognosis. Usually they will tighten back to normal in 1-2 weeks. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma and is fairly common with this type of trauma. 
    Treatment: Minimize movement as soon as possible. Check to see if your child can close his teeth together normally. Firm pressure from a washcloth to control bleeding of the gum tissue, soft diet, and over the counter pain medications are indicated as needed. Contact us for an evaluation.

Dental Fluorosis 


One of the many types of common tooth discoloration is Dental Fluorosis.  Dental Fluorosis is a developmental distrurbance of dental enamel caused by excessive exposure to high concentrations of fluoride during tooth development.  These changes are most prone to occur in children between 20 and 30 months of age.  The critial period of exposure is between 1 and 4 years old.  Dental Fluorosis occurs when a child ingest too much fluoride.  Be certain that your child can fully spit out their toothpaste before introducing fluoride toothpaste .  When a child swallows fluoride toothpaste at a young age it can affect their permanent teeth that are forming.  The affects of fluorosis are strinctly cosmetic.   The teeth are actually stronger because of the extra fluoride, however fluorosis can cause severe stain throughout the teeth.  

How to treat Dental Fluorosis?

Dental fluorosis can be cosmetically treated by a dentist.  Tooth bleaching, moicroabrasion, or a conservative composite restoration are commonly used treatements.  Typically bleaching and microabrasion are used for superficial staining, where constructive restorations are used for more unaesthetic situations. 
  

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