Posts Under Cavity Prevention

Frequent snacking can contribute to your child's tooth decay.  Avoid snacking throughout the day.  Try to encourage your child to have 3 meals and 2 snacks per day.  Pick healthy tooth-friendly snacks like cheese, blueberries, whole wheat cereal, vegtables, almounds, or yogurt.  It is ok to have sweets sometimes, just not every day.   

Image result for healthy snacks

What causes tooth decay?  Sugar doesn't cause tooth decay.  You can put a tooth in a bowl of sugar or breast milk for years and the tooth will not decay.  Acid need to be present in order for tooth decay to occur along with sugar.  The acid is produced when the sugars in foods or drinks react with bacteria present on the tooth surface.  The acid production leads to the loss of calcium from the enamel causing deminralization which is the begining process of tooth decay.  Keeping your mouth clean by brushing twice and flossing once daily your risks of tooth decay will go down significantly.   

Image result for decay process

  

Sipping on things like soda, juice, and sports drinks will cause decalcification and decay.  Tooth decalcification is a process in which the teeth lose calcium.  This is caused by poor oral hyiene, not brushing two times daily or flossing.  Decalcification can also be caused by sipping on sweet liquids that contain sugar and acid.

The sugar and acid contained in these drinks are very harmful to our teeth.  It will cause cavities and tooth decalcification.   If you are going to drink these beverages, the most important thing to remember is consumption time.  The longer the sugar and acid is on your teeth, the more likely damage will be done.  So just remember don't sip all day and get decay.  Keep your smile happy and healthy.


Fluoride is a compound that contains fluorine, a natural element.  Using small amounts of fluoride on a routine basis helps prevent tooth decay.  Fluoride makes your teeth less dissoluble in acid.  Fluoride encourages "remineralization," a strengthening of weakened areas of tooth enamel. 

Fluoride can occur naturally in water but is often added to community water supplies.  It is found in many different foods and in dental products such as toothpaste, mouth rinses, gels, and varnish.  Fluoride is most effective when combined with a healthy diet and good oral hygiene.   

Fun Facts!

1. Systemic fluoride has been shown to reduce caries between 50 to 70 percent. 

2.  Water fluoridation is still the No. 1 cost effective way to prevent tooth decay.  However, 30 percent of communities in the United States do not have fluoride in their public sources of water. 

3.  Children may need fluoride supplements if they drink water that is not optimally fluoridated.  Dr. Glenn considers many different factors before recommending a fluoride supplement.  Your child's age, risk of developing dental decay and the different liquids your child drinks are important considerations.  Bottled, filter, and well waters vary in their fluoride amount, so a water analysis may be necessary to ensure your child is receiving the proper amount.

What Are Sealants?


 

Dental sealants are thin plastic coatings that are applied to the grooves on the chewing surfaces of the back teeth to protect them from tooth decay. Most tooth decay in children and teens occurs on these surfaces. Sealants protect the chewing surfaces from tooth decay by keeping germs and food particles out of these grooves.

Permanent molars are the most likely to benefit from sealants. The first molars usually come into the mouth when a child is about 6 years old. Second molars appear at about age 12. It is best if the sealant is applied soon after the teeth have erupted, before they have a chance to decay.

Applying sealants does not require drilling or removing tooth structure. The process is short and easy. After the tooth is cleaned, a special gel is placed on the chewing surface for 30 seconds.   The tooth is then washed off and dried. Then, the sealant is painted on the tooth. The dentist or dental assistant shines a light on the tooth to harden the sealant. 

Sealants can only be seen up close. Sealants can be white, and usually are not seen when a child talks or smiles.

As with anything new that is placed in the mouth, a child may feel the sealant with the tongue. Sealants, however, are very thin and only fill the pits and grooves of molar teeth.

A sealant can last for as long as 5 to 10 years.  Sealants should be checked at each regular dental appointment and can be reapplied if they are no longer in place.

Sealants do not protect between the teeth, only the biting surface on the pits and fissures area of the tooth.  This means your child still needs to flossing daily to avoid interproximal (in between) tooth cavities.  

Image result for dental check up kids
Visiting your dentist every 6 months to have a dental exam, have debris removed, and a fluoride treatment applied.  Dental hygiene is very important! Simply removing bacteria daily will significantly bring your decay risk factors down.  Brush twice a day and floss once a day. Use fluoride toothpaste around the age of 4 years old, when your child is able to spit toothpaste without swallowing it.  Fluoride make childs teeth less disolvable in acid.  Beware of frequent snacking.   Also, assure proper fluoride through drinking water (city water contains fluoride, while well water does not).  You may want to start a reward chart/sticker chart to make caring for your teeth a positive reinforcement.  If you are already brushing twice a day and flossing but still have a high decay rate, you may want to add a fluoride rinse once per day.      

What causes tooth decay?  Sugar doesn't cause tooth decay.  You can put a tooth in a bowl of sugar or breast milk for years and the tooth will not decay.  Acid need to be present in order for tooth decay to occur along with sugar.  The acid is produced when the sugars in foods or drinks react with bacteria present on the tooth surface.  The acid production leads to the loss of calcium from the enamel causing deminralization which is the begining process of tooth decay.  Keeping your mouth clean by brushing twice and flossing once daily your risks of tooth decay will go down significantly.   

Image result for decay process

Frequent snacking can contribute to your child's tooth decay.  Avoid snacking throughout the day.  Try to encourage your child to have 3 meals and 2 snacks per day.  Pick healthy tooth-friendly snacks like cheese, blueberries, whole wheat cereal, vegtables, almounds, or yogurt.  It is ok to have sweets sometimes, just not every day.   

Image result for healthy snacks


Most children start using a fluoride toothpaste around 4-5 years old.  Fluoride is an important preventative measure that helps make our teeth less dissolvable in acid, which ultimately means less decay.  It is important for your child to use fluoride free toothpaste until they can fully spit it out.  If fluoride toothpaste is swallowed frequently, your child could develop dental fluorosis.  Dental Fluorosis can permanently discolor the adult teeth, but is strictly cosmetic.  

  

Sipping on things like soda, juice, and sports drinks will cause decalcification and decay.  Tooth decalcification is a process in which the teeth lose calcium.  This is caused by poor oral hyiene, not brushing two times daily or flossing.  Decalcification can also be caused by sipping on sweet liquids that contain sugar and acid.

The sugar and acid contained in these drinks are very harmful to our teeth.  It will cause cavities and tooth decalcification.   If you are going to drink these beverages, the most important thing to remember is consumption time.  The longer the sugar and acid is on your teeth, the more likely damage will be done.  So just remember don't sip all day and get decay.  Keep your smile healthy and happy this summer. 
  

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