Archive for April 2014


Trauma to Baby Teeth
Due to the active nature of children, trauma to the primary teeth (baby teeth) is very common. Most accidents to your child's baby teeth look bad, but may not require immediate attention. Swelling is to be expected and may look worse 12-24 hours after the injury. 

  • Tooth is knocked out  
    Clinical signs: The whole baby tooth is gone from its socket.
    Treatment: Control bleeding with firm pressure from a cloth. Locate the tooth and save for visual inspection by your child’s dentist.  Place the tooth in milk and contact us as soon as possible. Provide over-the-counter pain medicine and soft diet as needed. Contact us for evaluation.

  • Tooth is gray or brown in color
    Clinical signs: Tooth appears darker in color. Up to 70% of injured baby teeth can darken. A dark baby tooth does not always require treatment. These teeth are at a higher risk for dental abscess (infection).
    Treatment: Over-the-counter pain medicine if pain is associated with the discoloration.  Clinical examination and x-ray by us to evaluate for a dental abscess.

  • Tooth hit but not loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will sometimes exhibit some bleeding along the gum line but no real mobility of the tooth. These teeth will often be sore for 1-3 days but have a very good prognosis. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma. 
    Treatment: Soft diet and over the counter pain medicine (Tylenol) are indicated for initial treatment. Contact us for an evaluation.

  • Tooth hit and loose
    Clinical signs: These teeth will usually exhibit bleeding and bruising of the gum tissue but appear to be in proper position. They may “wiggle” back and forth or side to side. These teeth will often be sore for several days and have a guarded prognosis. Usually they will tighten back to normal in 1-2 weeks. Discoloration may be noted at any time after the trauma and is fairly common with this type of trauma. 
    Treatment: Minimize movement as soon as possible. Check to see if your child can close his teeth together normally. Firm pressure from a washcloth to control bleeding of the gum tissue, soft diet, and over the counter pain medications are indicated as needed. Contact us for an evaluation.

Fluoride

April 03, 2014 | Posted Cavity Prevention | 1 - Comment



Fluoride is a compound that contains fluorine, a natural element.  Using small amounts of fluoride on a routine basis helps prevent tooth decay.  Fluoride makes your teeth less disolvable in acid.  Fluoride encourages "remineralization," a strengthening of weakened areas of tooth enamel. 

Fluoride can occur naturally in water but is often added to community water supplies.  It is found in many different foods and in dental products such as toothpaste, mouth rinses, gels, and varnish.  Fluoride is most effective when combined with a healthy diet and good oral hygiene.   

Fun Facts!

1. Systemic fluoride has been shown to reduce caries between 50 to 70 percent. 

2.  Water fluoridation is still the No. 1 cost effective way to prevent tooth decay.  However, 30 percent of communities in the United States do not have fluoride in their public sources of water. 

3.  Children aged 6 months to 16 years may need fluoride supplements if they drink water that is not optimally fluoridated.  The pediatric dentist considers many different factors before recommending a fluoride supplement.  Your child's age, risk of developing dental decay and the different liquids your child drinks are important considerations.  Bottled, fliter, and well waters vary in their fluoride amount, so a water analysis may be necessary to ensure your child is receiving the proper amount.

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